CrockPot

How to Make Homemade Bone Broth (2 Ways)

Equipment Needed

  • Slow-Cook/Crock Pot or Instant Pot (electric pressure cooker) - at least 6 quarts
  • Mesh strainer
  • Large bowl or large measuring cup (preferably with spout)

Ingredients

  • About 2lbs of bones - try to use a variety of different bones such as chicken backs, necks, gizzards, feet or jointy bones (leg, thigh, wing bones, etc.)***
  • Filtered water - enough to just cover the bones
  • 1-2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
  • 2-3 stalks of celery, roughly chopped (optional)**
  • 1 yellow onion or shallot, roughly chopped (optional)**
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic (optional)**

Instructions - CrockPot

  • Place bones, veggies and apple cider vinegar in your crock-pot and fill with filtered water, just enough to cover the bones.
  • Cover and turn on high heat for 3-4 hours then switch to low heat. If you're not going to be home to switch it after 3-4 hours just start and keep it on the low setting.
  • Keep on low for 24-48 hours, stir bones a couple times throughout if you'd like. (I've found that with my crock-pot batches, 24-28 hours seems to be the sweet spot, richest flavor and more gelatinous).
  • Once you've hit AT LEAST the 24 hour mark, turn off and let cool. Sometime I let it cool for about an hour before handling it.
  • Using a fine mesh strainer, strainer your broth into another large bowl. You may need to do this in batches. A large bowl or large measuring cup that has a spout will make pouring your broth into containers easier! DO NOT THROW OUT YOUR BONES YET!
  • Store your broth in mason jars, freezer safe containers or portion into silicone ice cube trays.
  • Return your bones to the crock pot and REPEAT the above steps. Yes you can get TWO bathes out of the bones!! Many people skip this step and only do one. The second batch will not be as rich as the first but it will still have good nutrition and flavor (usually a little weaker). I will often use my second batch as the base for soups and stews.

Instructions - Instant Pot

  • Place bones, veggies and apple cider vinegar in your Instant Pot insert.
  • Fill with filtered water, just enough to cover the bones, about 1 inch below the max fill line usually.
  • Seal the lid on your Instant Pot and make sure your release valve is turned to sealing position.
  • Select the "Soup" setting, make sure it's on high pressure, and adjust the time to at least 90 minutes (I usually do 120 minutes)
  • Once it has come to pressure, it will start counting down from 120 minutes.
  • Once 120 minutes is complete, your Instant Pot will switch to the Keep Warm/Off function and start counting up from when it has finished. I usually let the pressure naturally release in the "Keep Warm" setting. This can take about 20 minutes or so. You'll know all the pressure has released once the small sliver float valve next to the release valve has dropped. The lid will then be unlocked and you'll be able to open your Instant Pot to see your liquid gold!
  • Using a fine mesh strainer, strainer your broth into another large bowl. You may need to do this in batches. A large bowl or large measuring cup that has a spout will make pouring your broth into containers easier! DO NOT THROW OUT YOUR BONES YET!
  • Store your broth in mason jars, freezer safe containers or portion into silicone ice cube trays.
  • Return your bones to the Instant Pot and REPEAT the above steps. Yes you can get TWO bathes out of the bones!! Many people skip this step and only do one. The second batch will not be as rich as the first but it will still have good nutrition and flavor (usually a little weaker). I will often use my second batch as the base for soups and stews.

Uses for Bone Broth

  • Breakfast Soup - I usually add eggs, some fresh herbs, veggies or sausage for a really nourishing breakfast!
  • Base of soups and stews
  • Enjoy a mug or bowl totally plain, I usually season with a little Himalayan Sea Salt 
  • Base of sauces, glazes, marinades, etc.
  • Cooking liquid for roasted meats

Special Notes

***I like to use a combination of bones that have some meat on them still, like what you find with chicken backs, and bones that are pretty cleaned off. I save ALL bones from meats I cook. Simply rinse them off and throw them in a container or bag in the freezer. Certain health food stores will typically keep chicken backs, feet, etc. in the freezer or you can make friends with a local farmer for bones! High quality bones are key to making a high quality, nutrient dense bone broth! I suggest using local, pastured poultry or beef bones as your first choice and organic as your second choice.

** A lot of times I don't even bother with the additional veggies if I'm trying to just get a batch going real quick. I also like to leave it plain sometimes because then I can use it in soups or stews and season it how I like from there.

*I don't skim anything off of my broth when it's finished. I don't find it's necessary if you're using high quality bones. You'll notice that the fat separates to the top of the broth pretty quickly, especially after it has cooled and solidified in the fridge. If you know you have difficulty breaking down fats you can remove this fat. Sometimes I will also remove it and save it in a separate jar to use for cooking fat. Sometimes you broth will "gel" and sometimes it won't. This is completely normal! Usually my first batch gels really well (it will be totally gelatinous) but my second batch with the same bones will not. You're still getting lots of nutrients don't worry!

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Slow Cooker Paleo Applesauce

Equipment Needed

  • Slowcooker or CrockPot
  • Sharp knife
  • Apple corer (if you have one, not necessary though)
  • Vegetable/fruit peeler

Ingredients

  • 12-14 medium apples
  • 2 tablespoons of cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cardamom (optional)
  • 1/2 cup of water

Instructions

  • Using your veggie peeler, roughly peel the skin off your apples. I personally don't mind if there is a little bit of skin in my apple sauce but you may choose to remove it completely.
  • If you're using an apple corer, remove the core and then roughly chop your apples into medium sized chunks. (Again, its a personal preference to have my apple sauce slightly chunkier, if you like it to be really fine, simply cut your apples into much smaller pieces.)
  • If you're not using an apple corer, I like to remove the core by cutting the apple into quarters, slicing alongside the core, all the way through the apple so you're left with a box shaped core. If you start cutting about 1/2 -3/4 of an inch away from the center of your apple you should slice right along the outside of the core. (Sometimes you do go through some of the core.) I carefully remove any pieces of apple core that might have been included in my quarters. I like this method because it's a bit quicker in my opinion and I don't have to manhandle my apple slices as much to remove the core.
  • Once all your apples have been peeled, cored, and roughly chopped, place into your slow cooker or CrockPot, with your spices and water. Stir until the spices are combined
  • Turn your slow cooker or CrockPot on low and let cook for about 3 hours, stirring a couple times throughout. Some chunks should remain but for the most part it will be very saucey!
  • Store in glass jars in the fridge for up to 2 weeks or in the freezer to enjoy for many months to come! ( Make sure you do not overfill your jars if storing in the freezer as the sauce will expand some while freezing)

 

  • Tip: I like to eat my applesauce with a little bit of full-fat coconut milk and shredded coconut drizzled on top, so good and one of my favorite desserts!
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